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A lot of basketball has been played so far.  Shooters are a hot commodity, but there aren't very many of them.  Who are they?  Here is my list so far, please feel free to add.  Lets discuss!  Remember....scorers and shooters are two different kinds of players.

 

Audrey Postula - Lumberton

Keily Allen - Hamshire Fannett

Delberta Guillory-Smith - Hardin Jefferson

Hannah Hawkins - Woden

Rachel Sarlls - Barbers Hill

Cameron Dill - United

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2 things here.  I've seen shooter with my own eyes that took like 10 3's and might be missed 1.  Mailyn Wilkerson from Summer Creek gets buckets in her sleep.  2nd thing here is I don't think Cam is our best 3pt shooter.  she can ahoot, yea, but I'm leaning more toward Cooper, Anderson, or Boudreaux as far as the 3 ball goes.  

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3 hours ago, BMTSoulja1 said:

2 things here.  I've seen shooter with my own eyes that took like 10 3's and might be missed 1.  Mailyn Wilkerson from Summer Creek gets buckets in her sleep.  2nd thing here is I don't think Cam is our best 3pt shooter.  she can ahoot, yea, but I'm leaning more toward Cooper, Anderson, or Boudreaux as far as the 3 ball goes.  

You know I was gonna say Cooper. I think that Dill can be put in the scorer category if you consider her role on the team. And yes indeed Wilkerson is a BUCKET.

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13 hours ago, OneChance said:

Postula, definitely has a nice stroke too, don’t leave her open in the corner!
 

The art of the shot is not really taught around this area, girls are just being taught to get to the rim!

I don't think that its not being taught - every coach I know teaches shooting.  it is more about girls in this area don't get in the gym during the off season and work to become great shooters.   During the season is not the time for this - it has to be done in the off season.    The problem is much deeper than how coaches are teaching or not teaching.       I think it has much more to do with what is emphasized by the school, the media, the parents, lil dribbles programs etc.    I would bet everyone of the girls mentioned above has put in some serious time in the off-season shooting.    

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16 hours ago, OneChance said:

Postula, definitely has a nice stroke too, don’t leave her open in the corner!
 

The art of the shot is not really taught around this area, girls are just being taught to get to the rim!

Not being taught by who?  If a high school basketball player is counting on learning how to shoot during the months of Oct-Feb from their school coach.. then they might as well not even worry about it.  Junior high coaches can teach form shooting, ball handling, court awareness, pivoting (IMPORTANT), and other things.. but it can't stop when season is over and honestly it should've began long before junior high sports.  I hate youth sports but camps are great.  Either way, it is impossible to become a good shooter at basketball practice alone.

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1 hour ago, Coach.Shu said:

 I think it has much more to do with what is emphasized by the school, the media, the parents, lil dribbles programs etc. 

Yeah, infrastructure is a big part of any successful sports program, regardless of gender. Using the "King of Sports" in SETX, football, as the example, it is common knowledge that the top programs in the area are who they are because the players are developed from the time the pads weigh more than the players do, via youth leagues.

This type of setup simply does not exist for girls basketball, save the small number of "historical" girls basketball programs in the area, and even that is not the same because there are not the numbers to have separate girls Little Dribblers programs at the youngest ages these days, as compared to years back. Also, the true intent of girls AAU basketball as it stands today as it stands to developing skilled players, could be called into question, imo...

2 hours ago, Coach.Shu said:

it is more about girls in this area don't get in the gym during the off season and work to become great shooters. 

One last example, how many schools have shooting machines for basketball (or if they have them, do they WORK), that developing players can readily access? Or have structured program (official or unofficial, lol) to help build the skill level. If they do it is still probably a fight between the boys and girls program for use. To become a great shooter, it needs to be hundreds of shots EVERY DAY at game speed, not every now and then.... Most schools don't provide this type of setup.

Teams like Argyle haven't run up five straight championships without some type of commitment level similar to what is seen in boy's football.....

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Mean Machine said:

Yeah, infrastructure is a big part of any successful sports program, regardless of gender. Using the "King of Sports" in SETX, football, as the example, it is common knowledge that the top programs in the area are who they are because the players are developed from the time the pads weigh more than the players do, via youth leagues.

This type of setup simply does not exist for girls basketball, save the small number of "historical" girls basketball programs in the area, and even that is not the same because there are not the numbers to have separate girls Little Dribblers programs at the youngest ages these days, as compared to years back. Also, the true intent of girls AAU basketball as it stands today as it stands to developing skilled players, could be called into question, imo...

One last example, how many schools have shooting machines for basketball (or if they have them, do they WORK), that developing players can readily access? Or have structured program (official or unofficial, lol) to help build the skill level. If they do it is still probably a fight between the boys and girls program for use. To become a great shooter, it needs to be hundreds of shots EVERY DAY at game speed, not every now and then.... Most schools don't provide this type of setup.

Teams like Argyle haven't run up five straight championships without some type of commitment level similar to what is seen in boy's football.....

 

 

Piss poor excuse.  I didn't have a shooting machine and made more three pointers in the state than any kid that played.  Any classification.  

Larry Bird didn't have a shooting machine either.. in fact.. it was because of him exactly why I was able to shoot so well.  He said one time when asked what needed to be done to become a great shooter like him: "Wake up before the sun comes up and shoot game shots until school starts, go in the gym during lunch and shoot game shots while your opponents eat, stay after practice and shoot game shots until it's time to eat/sleep.  Repeat everyday.  Do that, and you may be able to shoot as well as I can."

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30 minutes ago, oldschool2 said:

Larry Bird didn't have a shooting machine either.. in fact.. it was because of him exactly why I was able to shoot so well

Funny enough, it this is the same reason my daughter is an above average shooter as well

30 minutes ago, oldschool2 said:

Piss poor excuse.

Was not making an excuse, just making an observation. 

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31 minutes ago, oldschool2 said:

"Wake up before the sun comes up and shoot game shots until school starts, go in the gym during lunch and shoot game shots while your opponents eat, stay after practice and shoot game shots until it's time to eat/sleep.  Repeat everyday.  Do that, and you may be able to shoot as well as I can."

 

32 minutes ago, oldschool2 said:

To become a great shooter, it needs to be hundreds of shots EVERY DAY at game speed, not every now and then.... Most schools don't provide this type of setup.

believe we on the same page here, just coming at it from different angles. No substitute for hard work you are exactly right.........

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6 minutes ago, Mean Machine said:

 

Funny enough, it this is the same reason my daughter is an above average shooter as well

Was not making an excuse, just making an observation. 

I wasn't implying that it's an excuse you were making, just a bad excuse for anyone to make.  Want to shoot better?  PUT IN THE TIME/EFFORT necessary.  Not just shots.  Proper shots.  Practice doesn't make perfect practice makes permanent.  You have to practice doing the right thing.

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I’m not talking about school coaching at all, the girls that are playing AAU ball and taking private lessons is what I’m talking about, and like Coach Schu mentioned in youth sports. If a High School coach is teaching and breaking down the shot, it’s too late.
 

A HS coach should be able to see if a shooter is struggling and make adjustments.

Little Dribblers in this area is the most popular youth basketball in this area and the leagues do not train the coaches, so you end up with a bunch of moms and dads teaching form shooting completely wrong. Then most private lessons focus so much attention on ball handling and getting to the rim and you get scorers from this and not shooters! 

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4 hours ago, oldschool2 said:

Piss poor excuse.  I didn't have a shooting machine and made more three pointers in the state than any kid that played.  Any classification.  

Larry Bird didn't have a shooting machine either.. in fact.. it was because of him exactly why I was able to shoot so well.  He said one time when asked what needed to be done to become a great shooter like him: "Wake up before the sun comes up and shoot game shots until school starts, go in the gym during lunch and shoot game shots while your opponents eat, stay after practice and shoot game shots until it's time to eat/sleep.  Repeat everyday.  Do that, and you may be able to shoot as well as I can."

I too am from the pre shooting machine era lol, but I think that this can also allude to a bigger problem, and that is exactly how much is that type of work ethic actually being promoted. Now times have definitely changed since our days and that is ok. But outside of the 1% or less of girl players who are willing to work on their craft NO MATTER WHAT or have put in countless hours in the summer developing their craft whether its AAU or just skill training,  how many are there to encourage or make things accessible for the girls to get better.  Im not saying every Coach doesnt want their players to get better, but there are some who talk that good talk but when players actually reach out during the summer or off season in an effort to get in the gym to get better....nothing is accessible.  How many Coaches actually took advantage of UIL's new rule concerning off season and summer skill training?  Now i know some are gonna say that if the kids cant get in the gym then just go to the neighborhood park or put up shots in their driveways but lets be realistic....in these days and times it probably wont happen.

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4 hours ago, oldschool2 said:

Not just shots.  Proper shots.  Practice doesn't make perfect practice makes permanent.  You have to practice doing the right thing.

This right here is what I am talking about, the proper techniques are not taught like they should be, so there are girls that put in work, but still aren’t great shooters, but great scorers. They get to the rim successfully and finish (which is not a bad thing) but they just aren’t as proficient on the outside shot.

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5 minutes ago, $$Buckets$$ said:

I too am from the pre shooting machine era lol, but I think that this can also allude to a bigger problem, and that is exactly how much is that type of work ethic actually being promoted. Now times have definitely changed since our days and that is ok. But outside of the 1% or less of girl players who are willing to work on their craft NO MATTER WHAT or have put in countless hours in the summer developing their craft whether its AAU or just skill training,  how many are there to encourage or make things accessible for the girls to get better.  Im not saying every Coach doesnt want their players to get better, but there are some who talk that good talk but when players actually reach out during the summer or off season in an effort to get in the gym to get better....nothing is accessible.  How many Coaches actually took advantage of UIL's new rule concerning off season and summer skill training?  Now i know some are gonna say that if the kids cant get in the gym then just go to the neighborhood park or put up shots in their driveways but lets be realistic....in these days and times it probably wont happen.

Exactly, HJ hawks are successful, because Coach Fogo has the gym open 24/7, if not they all have access to the Nome Dome, most schools kids are lucky to have access once a week. Too many distractions these days to not shoot in the front yard. 

My kid learned her left hand, because she would tell me she is bored in the 4th grade and I would throw her a basketball and make her dribble around the neighborhood with her left hand only! 
 

Yesterday, she drove 2 hours to work with trainer for two hours and drive two hours back. Then came home ran to grocery store bought her food for the week and meal prepped for the week. She works out every single day to get stronger. She has come home after a tough physical game, changed clothes and went and worked out. She has lost 15 pounds since last season and looks faster, quicker, is jumping higher than she ever has. 

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16 hours ago, OneChance said:

I’m not talking about school coaching at all, the girls that are playing AAU ball and taking private lessons is what I’m talking about, and like Coach Schu mentioned in youth sports. If a High School coach is teaching and breaking down the shot, it’s too late.
 

A HS coach should be able to see if a shooter is struggling and make adjustments.

Little Dribblers in this area is the most popular youth basketball in this area and the leagues do not train the coaches, so you end up with a bunch of moms and dads teaching form shooting completely wrong. Then most private lessons focus so much attention on ball handling and getting to the rim and you get scorers from this and not shooters! 

No argument here.  In fact, I think little dribblers is the single biggest contributor to bad basketball in rural America.  Kids don't learn anything except bad habits.  Girls especially (with shooting) are often times not big enough or strong enough at very young ages to get the ball to the rim so they are encouraged to get it up there however they can.  That's so detrimental.  Small school basketball is a cesspool of 2 handed shooting, right handed dribbling, and stupid fouls / tie-ups. It's hard for me to even watch high school basketball anymore (locally) because I just stay mad the entire time. 

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16 hours ago, $$Buckets$$ said:

I too am from the pre shooting machine era lol, but I think that this can also allude to a bigger problem, and that is exactly how much is that type of work ethic actually being promoted. Now times have definitely changed since our days and that is ok. But outside of the 1% or less of girl players who are willing to work on their craft NO MATTER WHAT or have put in countless hours in the summer developing their craft whether its AAU or just skill training,  how many are there to encourage or make things accessible for the girls to get better.  Im not saying every Coach doesnt want their players to get better, but there are some who talk that good talk but when players actually reach out during the summer or off season in an effort to get in the gym to get better....nothing is accessible.  How many Coaches actually took advantage of UIL's new rule concerning off season and summer skill training?  Now i know some are gonna say that if the kids cant get in the gym then just go to the neighborhood park or put up shots in their driveways but lets be realistic....in these days and times it probably wont happen.

I have a lot of friends in the coaching world on every level all the way up to college.  I think you're grossly underestimating how much gym availability these kids have during the summer.  

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I think it can be agreed upon that each of these young ladies listed have "put in the work" that oldschool2 has described, and they deserve the recognition for that work. I am sure there are some more that should be listed also, as these type of lists always omit worthy player(s).

More global theories on why things aren't as good as they could be are harder to figure out, as there are more moving pieces involved as you move out from putting the work in as an individual, to putting the work in as a part of a larger unit (i.e. team, school, community, etc.).

Thank you to the coaches, parents, and other mentors that have supported these young ladies, and all the other young ladies that play girls basketball. It could not be done at ANY level without their efforts.

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1 hour ago, oldschool2 said:

No argument here.  In fact, I think little dribblers is the single biggest contributor to bad basketball in rural America.  Kids don't learn anything except bad habits.  Girls especially (with shooting) are often times not big enough or strong enough at very young ages to get the ball to the rim so they are encouraged to get it up there however they can.  That's so detrimental.  Small school basketball is a cesspool of 2 handed shooting, right handed dribbling, and stupid fouls / tie-ups. It's hard for me to even watch high school basketball anymore (locally) because I just stay mad the entire time. 

Little dribblers can also be a very instrumental tool for the development of kids.  It just depends on the people who are leading the way.  Now finding people who are knowledgeable in basketball fundamentals and are able to teach them is an entirely different subject lol.  I cant speak on every small school in the area but I know for a fact that for schools like HJ little dribblers was VERY beneficial.  Fundamentals were emphasized and taught to those girls at an early age (form shooting, man to man defense with no hands, passing etc) and those things are paying off for them.  Now I do agree that little dribblers can also be the reason for lack of knowledge and bad habits for a lot of girl players but I put that on the people who are involved with their development.

Everyone is making great points and I am extremely happy that we are even discussing girls basketball, because in our area the culture for girls basketball isnt very strong or is vastly under valued. 

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29 minutes ago, Jacks03 said:

2 Shooters that have been overlooked are Jayda Argumon and Shannon Whitehead from Woodville.  Whitehead has unlimited range with her 3 pter and Argumon has the ability to shoot the mid range as well as the 3 Ball with an absolute pure shot. 

I like both of those players!  I completely agree with you on Whitehead being a shooter, however I would put Argumon in the scorers category especially in the role that she plays for Woodville.

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1 hour ago, oldschool2 said:

I have a lot of friends in the coaching world on every level all the way up to college.  I think you're grossly underestimating how much gym availability these kids have during the summer.  

I do also, thats why I am able to say that the ones who do make gyms available are greatly outnumbered by the ones who dont especially for girls in our area. Or they say its gonna be open gym but lets be honest.....it is primarily for the boys.  Then the girls have to "get in where they fit in" which in that case some will but most wont. 

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